Network Security | Faculty | Kelowna

Rich Teer | Instructor  

Rich has been playing with and programming computers for more than 30 years. His first exposure to UNIX was a VAX 11-750 minicomputer running BSD 4.2, and it was then that his love of UNIX was kindled.

A career as a C/UNIX systems programmer segued into one as a UNIX systems administrator, where he concentrated his focus on the Solaris platform. A big proponent of open source software, Rich was part of a by-invitation-only pilot program to guide Sun Microsystems' open sourcing of their Solaris operating system, and served on the OpenSolaris Governing Board. Rich is the author of a C programming text book published by Prentice Hall called Solaris Systems Programming, and numerous UNIX programming and SysAdmin articles. He was also a technical reviewer for W. Richard Stevens' highly acclaimed book, UNIX Network Programming, 2nd Edition.

When he's not playing with computers, Rich is a passionate lover of music on vinyl records and high-end audio. Combining this and his interest in writing led to him publishing Vinylphile, the freely-downloadable, vinyl-centric audio magazine.

fred brown | INSTRUCTOR  

Fred has been working with and around computers since the mid-1960s. His first computer was a vacuum-tube based National Elliott 405 with a whopping 2048 bytes of main memory and a 128KB disk drive. It took up an entire classroom and only ran for a few hours at a time before needing to be serviced. It was learning about and programming this computer that was the start to his long career in information technology. He is a hacker of old, having modified the operating system of Digital Equipment’s PDP-10 to allow for batch scripts to be run interactively – a novel concept for its time. He was hired by Digital Equipment to further enhance that capability and stayed with them for 25 years until their demise.

Fred co-authored a paper on the “Portability of a Large Algol Program” while in undergraduate studies for his degree in Computer Science. He is a graduate of the University of Hertfordshire with a BSc. in Computer Science from 1972.

In his 50 years of computing, Fred has seen the rise and fall of many IT technologies. He has focused on Microsoft server systems since the days of Windows NT 3.1 and Exchange 4.0. In recent years, he’s been involved with cyber security, including privileged account management and public key infrastructure.

When he’s not working at his main hobby – computers – he also enjoys gardening, reading and listening to music.